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Posted by Marian Asantewah Nkansah on September 10, 2013 at 6:50 AM Comments comments (0)

Dear folks, for details on some of my recent articles, check my links to a collection at googlescholar on http://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&user=Ro-ktVgAAAAJ


Quality of groundwater in the Kwahu West district of Ghana

Posted by Marian Asantewah Nkansah on December 18, 2010 at 2:52 PM Comments comments (0)

 

*Marian Asantewah Nkansah, Juliet Ofosuah and Sandra Boakye

Department of Chemistry,

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi - Ghana

 


ABSTRACT

The quality of ground water in the Kwahu West District of Ghana was determined by the use of

physicochemical parameters together with trace metal contamination as indices of quality.

Standard methods for physicochemical determinations were employed. Atomic Absorption

Spectrophotometer was also used for the measurement of nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper

(Cu) and iron (Fe). Nitrate, Chloride, Alkalinity and Phosphate were also determined

photometrically. Results were compared with global averages for freshwater and international

water quality standards for drinking water, World Heath Organisation, (WHO). Evaluation of

physicochemical parameters revealed that the water samples were within the maximum

permissible limits for consumption. All elements except iron, lead and nickel, were well within the

safety limits recommended by WHO. The low level of industrialization in the study area has kept

the water relatively free from heavy metal contamination

.

Keywords: Contamination, physico-chemical, trace metals, ground water



Chemical quality of groundwater drawn from boreholes in the Ashanti region of Ghana

Posted by Marian Asantewah Nkansah on October 5, 2010 at 7:09 AM Comments comments (0)

  Chemical quality of groundwater drawn from boreholes in the

  Ashanti region of Ghana

 

M. A. NKANSAH1 & J. H. EPHRAIM2

1 Department of Chemistry, KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana

  maan4gr@yahoo.co.uk

2 Catholic University of Ghana, Fiapre, Ghana


  Abstract

In the Ashanti Region of Ghana, the physicochemical quality of groundwater sampled from 38

  wells in 24 communities in Ejisu-Juaben and Bosomtwi-Atwima-Kwanwoma districts was surveyed

  between November 2004 and June 2005. Water samples were analysed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC),

  SO42-, Cl-, PO43-, NO2- , Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cd, Na, K and Pb. The results revealed wide variations in analysed

  parameters: pH (4.0–8.0); EC (44–1110 μs·cm-1), turbidity (0.1–45 NTU), colour (<5–60 HU), hardness

  (3–400 mg CaCO3·L-1), alkalinity (10–365 mg CaCO3·L-1), Cl-1 (5–92 mg·L-1), SO42- (0.5–17 mg·L-1), PO43-

  (<0.01 to 2.4 mg·L-1) and NO2- (<0.01 to 0.08 mg·L-1). Elemental concentrations were Fe (0.06–3.4 mg·L-1),

  Mn (<0.01–1.6 mg·L-1), Cu (0.01–1.3 mg·L-1), Zn (<0.01–3.3 mg·L-1), Cd (<0.001–0.006 mg·L-1), Pb

  (<0.001–0.038 mg·L-1), Na (4–87 mg·L-1) and K (0.2–80 mg·L-1). With the exception of isolated cases of

  trace metal contamination and turbidity, water from the boreholes in the two districts had acceptable quality

  for domestic use.


  Key words : groundwater; physicochemical; quality; trace metals


Groundwater and Climate in Africa (Proceedings of the Kampala Conference, June 2008) 36 IAHS Publ. 334, 2009.

 

 



 

 

Heavy metal content of some common spices available in markets in the Kumasi metropolis of Ghana

Posted by Marian Asantewah Nkansah on September 18, 2010 at 5:11 PM Comments comments (0)

 

Heavy metal content of some common spices available in markets in the Kumasi metropolis of Ghana

 


Marian Asantewah NKANSAH, Cosmos OPOKU AMOAKO

Department of Chemistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi-

Ghana

maan4gr@yahoo.co.uk


ABSTRACT

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in monitoring heavy metal contamination of

spices. The concentrations of some heavy metals (lead, zinc, nickel, copper, iron, and mercury) in

15 common spices available at local markets in the Kumasi Metropolis were determined using

Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) from October, 2008 to February, 2009. The study showed

differences in metal concentrations according to the edible part (root, stem, leaf, and fruit). The

range of the concentrations of metals in dry weights were; Lead 0.1153 - 0.0973 g/kg, Zinc 0.074

- 0.059 g/kg, Nickel 0.0735 - 0.0593 g/kg, Copper 0.0210 - 0.009 g/kg, Iron 0.4942 - 0.1100 g/kg,

Mercury 1.300*10-6 - 2.493*10-5 g/kg respectively. Most of the levels in the spices were

acceptable with the exception of lead which was above the standard limit approved by WHO and

FAO for some of the samples. Consumers of these spices would not be exposed to any risk

associated with the daily intake of 10g of spices per day as far as metals; Zinc, Nickel, Copper,

Iron and Mercury are concerned. However Lead levels in Ginger, Negro pepper and Cinnamon

were above the standard value of 0.1 g/kg. Generally most of the spices available on the market

are safe for human consumption as far as trace metal levels are concerned.

Key words: Contamination, Heavy metals, Kumasi, Spices


Am. J. Sci. Ind. Res., 2010, 1(2): 158-163

 


Physicochemical Evaluation of The Water from Boreholes Selected from The EJ and BAK Districts of the Ashanti Region of Ghana

Posted by Marian Asantewah Nkansah on June 30, 2010 at 10:50 AM Comments comments (0)


M. A. Nkansah and J. H. Ephraim

Department of Chemistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology-Kumasi,

Ghana

maan4gr@yahoo.co.uk


Abstract

The circumstances of available water to many Districts in Ghana reflect the global

situation where water supplies needed for development are scarce and often polluted. This has

prompted the digging of numerous boreholes in many rural communities in Ghana. Though

the numbers of boreholes are impressive, there is the need to determine and monitor the

quality of water that is being drawn for human activity.

This work determined physicochemical parameters of water from 21 boreholes from 13

communities in the Ejisu-Juaben (EJ) and 17 boreholes in 11 communities in the Bosomtwi-

Atwima-Kwanwoma (BAK) districts of the Ashanti Region of Ghana (West Africa) within

the period of November 2004 to June 2005 with the aim of accessing the quality.

Water samples were analysed for pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC), Turbidity, Colour,

Total Hardness, Total Alkalinity TDS, SO42-, Cl-, PO43-, NO2- , Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cd, Na, K andPb.

The UV-Visible Spectrophotometer was used to determine SO42-, PO43- and NO2- concentration. An atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer was used to determine Fe, Mn, Cu,Zn, Cd, Pb. A flame photometer was used for the determination of Na and K, and titrimetry was employed to measure Alkalinity, Hardness and Chloride content.

The data showed the variation of the investigated parameters in samples as follows: pH

4.0-8.0, Electrical Conductivity (EC) 44 - 1114 μScm-1, Turbidity 0.11 - 45 NTU, Colour <5-

60 HU, TDS 31 -779 mgl-1, hardness 3-402 mgl-1, alkalinity 10-365 mgl-1 ,Cl- 5.0 - 92 mgl-1,SO42- 0.25-17.0 mgl-1, PO43- 0-2.4 mgl-1 and NO2- 0-0.08 mgl-1.

The rest were Fe 0.01-3.4 mgl-1, Mn 0-1.65 mgl-1, Cu 0.01 -1.3 mgl-1, Zn 0-3.3 mgl-1,

Cd 0 - 0.059 mgl-1, Pb 0-0.038 mgl-1, Na 4-87.0 mgl-1 and K 0.2-68 mgl-1.

With the exception of isolated cases of trace metal contamination and turbidity, the

general results showed that water from the boreholes in the two districts had acceptable

chemical quality for household activities


Keywords: trace metals, water, contamination, quality


Thammasat Int. J. Sc. Tech., Vol. 14, No. 3, July-September 2009

Assessment of the Quality of Water from Hand-Dug Wells in Ghana

Posted by Marian Asantewah Nkansah on June 30, 2010 at 10:47 AM Comments comments (4)


Marian Asantewah Nkansah, Nathaniel Owusu Boadi and Mercy Badu

Department of Chemistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.  


Abstract

 

This study focused upon the determination of physicochemical and microbial properties, including metals, selected anions and coliform bacteria in drinking water samples from hand-dug wells in the Kumasi metropolis of the Republic of Ghana. The purpose was to assess the quality of water from these sources. Ten different water samples were taken from different parts of Kumasi, the capital of the Ashanti region of Ghana and analyzed for physicochemical parameters including pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, alkalinity total hardness and coliform bacteria. Metals and anions analyzed were Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, NO3-, NO2-, SO4 2-, PO4 2-, F- and Cl-. Bacteria analysed were total coliform and Escherichia coli.

The data showed variation of the investigated parameters in samples as follows: pH, 6.30–0.70; conductivity (EC), 46–682 µS/cm; PO43-, 0.67–76.00 mg/L; F-, 0.20–0.80 mg/L; NO3-, 0–0.968 mg/L; NO2-, 0–0.063 mg/L; SO4−2, 3.0–07.0 mg/L; Fe, 0–1.2 mg/L; Mn, 0–0.018 mg/L. Total coliform and Escherichia coli were below the minimum detection limit (MDL) of 20 MPN per 100 ml in all the samples. The concentrations of most of the investigated parameters in the drinking water samples from Ashanti region were within the permissible limits of the World Health Organization drinking water quality guidelines.


Keywords: hand-dug wells, metals, physiochemical, microbial, coliform


Categories: Environmental health :Environmental Health Insights 2010:4 7-12



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